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Wednesday, October 14, 2020 | History

4 edition of Voice and Grammatical Functions in Austronesian Languages (Center for the Study of Language and Information - Lecture Notes) found in the catalog.

Voice and Grammatical Functions in Austronesian Languages (Center for the Study of Language and Information - Lecture Notes)

Voice and Grammatical Functions in Austronesian Languages (Center for the Study of Language and Information - Lecture Notes)

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Published by Center for the Study of Language and Inf .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Grammar, syntax, linguistic structure,
  • Language Arts / Linguistics / Literacy,
  • Language Arts & Disciplines,
  • Austronesian & Malayo-Polynesian languages,
  • Language,
  • Linguistics,
  • Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsPeter K. Austin (Editor), Simon Musgrave (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages250
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8746505M
    ISBN 101575865009
    ISBN 109781575865003

    Over the past four decades, the nature of western Austronesian voice—typically subcategorized as Philippine-type and Indonesian-type—has triggered considerable debate in the typological and syntactic literature. Central questions in these debates have been concerned with how voice alternations in western Austronesian languages interact with grammatical relations, transitivity, and. grammatical relations. Thus, Bickel et al. () find a processing bias favouring actors, even in languages with ergative systems, like Hindi. In this paper, I will investigate the question whether Austronesian symmetrical voice languages – despite their symmetry of actor and undergoer arguments in terms of linking.

    Austronesian alignment, also known as the Philippine-type voice system or Austronesian focus system, is a typologically unusual kind of morphosyntactic alignment in which "one argument can be marked as having a special relationship to the verb".This special relationship manifests itself as a voice affix on the verb that corresponds to a noun within the same clause that is either marked for a. Some Austronesian languages are spoken in the area extending from Madagascar to eastern Indonesia and to the north to Taiwan and the Philippines. They vary greatly in almost every possible respect, including the size and social make-up of the speech communities and their typological profiles.

    Gas per Begus The Origins of the Voice/Focus System in Austronesian The body of this paper is structured as follows: in the r st pa rt, I present the reconstructed PAN voice system (from Wolff ) as well as descriptive facts from six AN languages that are pa rticularly informative for reconstruction of the proto-sy stem as well as. In short, the use (or non-use) of P-suffixes or P-enclitics in Ansus (and other Yapen languages) is the morphological means used to monitor a change in grammatical functions: this is a voice choice, using pronominal marking choices to indicate the changing pragmatic and grammatical status of the two arguments of a bivalent clause (see Pearson.


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Voice and Grammatical Functions in Austronesian Languages (Center for the Study of Language and Information - Lecture Notes) Download PDF EPUB FB2

This volume explores various problems in the syntax of Austronesian languages, which are found primarily in Malaysia and the Polynesian islands.

Using the framework of constraint-based theories of syntax, contributors discuss the nature of these voice systems, the function of their verbal morphology, valence, verbal diathesis and transitivity in such languages, and the nature of their lexical categories.

The Paperback of the Voice and Grammatical Functions in Austronesian Languages by Peter K. Austin at Barnes & Noble.

FREE Shipping Pages: This volume explores various problems in the syntax of Austronesian languages, which are found primarily in Malaysia and the Polynesian islands.

Using the Voice and Grammatical Functions in Austronesian Languages (): Peter K. Austin and Simon Musgrave - BiblioVault. Voice and Grammatical Relations in Austronesian Languages. 1 ed. Standford CA USA: CSLI Publications, by:   This volume explores various problems in the syntax of Austronesian languages, which are found primarily in Malaysia and the Polynesian islands.

Using the framework of constraint-based theories of syntax, contributors discuss the nature of these voice systems, the function of their verbal morphology, valence, verbal diathesis and transitivity in such languages, and the nature of their.

Symmetrical Voice and Linking in Western Austronesian Languages. Series:Pacific Linguistics [PL] DE GRUYTER MOUTON This book is an in-depth study of the voice systems of Totoli, Balinese, Indonesian, and Tagalog, which shows that the symmetrical nature of these systems poses a problem to current linking theories.

It provides an. Like other Austronesian languages, the (surface) grammatical subject (i.e., the SUBJ in the f-structure or gr-subject for short) plays little role, especially in the binding of morphologically complex reflexives. The data from binding is supported by other syntactic tests such as topicalisation with pronominal copy.

This paper analyses voice and grammatical relations in Lamaholot (eastern Indonesia) in light of the typologies of voice systems in western Austronesian languages. These languages typically have no voice systems but show systematic pronominal agreement on the verbs.

3 Language types and their distributions In terms of voice systems and marking, the AN languages of Nusantara can be classified into four groups: (i) the language group with typical AN voice morphology, (ii) the group with mixed voice.

Arka, I W., and Manning, C.D. Voice and grammatical relations in Indonesian: a new perspective. Paper presented at the workshop on Voice and Grammatical Functions in Austronesian Languages, LFG98 Brisbane Australia. Stanford: CSLI. Hans-Martin Gärtner, Paul Law, and Joachim Sabel, eds.

Clause structure and adjuncts in Austronesian languages. Berlin/ New York: Mouton de Gruyter. ISBN $, hardcover. Just as teenagers divide the world into jocks, nerds, goths, preps, townies, posers, and so on, linguists tend to categorize languages in broad strokes by what is best.

Buru is an Austronesian (Central Malayo-Polynesian) language spoken by aro people on the island of Buru in eastern Indonesia.

Typologically, the language can be characterised as S V 0 (X. Some Austronesian languages are spoken in the area extending from Madagascar to eastern Indonesia and to the north to Taiwan and the Philippines.

They vary greatly in almost every possible respect, including the size and social make-up of the speech communities and their typological profiles.

This book is designed to serve as a reference work and in-depth introduction to these languages. languages spoken at the geographical extremes of the family, are verb-initial or predicate-initial, i.e., VSO or VOS.

In other Austronesian languages, the neutral word order is SVO or verb-medial; this order is represented in Micronesian languages and some Melanesian languages.

This book is an in-depth study of the voice systems of Totoli, Balinese, Indonesian, and Tagalog, which shows that the symmetrical nature of these systems poses a problem to current linking theories. It provides an analysis of symmetrical linking within two grammatical theories (LFG & RRG) and.

Grammatical Relations in Indonesian in Brief Indonesian transitive verbs can appear prefixed with meN-or di- or without a prefix.1 There is evidence that the Agent/l-subject Amir appearing with meN-(henceforth Agentive voice or AV) verbs in Indonesian as in (1) is syntactically the surface grammatical subject.

(1) a. Amir mem-baca buku itu. Grammatical relations in Balinese show good empirical evidence for the classification of syntactic dependents into core arguments, obliques and adjuncts. One of the core arguments is selected as Pivot, a well-defined syntactic notion with certain exclusive selectors, such as control and relativisation.

The selectors distinguishing core arguments from obliques and adjuncts include phrasal. Some Austronesian languages are spoken in the area extending from Madagascar to eastern Indonesia and to the north to Taiwan and the Philippines.

They vary greatly in almost every possible respect, including the size and social make-up of the speech communities and their typological profiles. This book is designed to serve as a reference work a. But most prior research concentrates on only certain types, predominantly passives.

Voice expresses relations between a predicate and a set of nominal positions - or their referents - in a clause or other structure.

Grammatical Voice is the first typological study of voice systems based on a multi-language survey. Wei-wen Roger Liao, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (Second Edition), Grammatical relations (or grammatical functions), such as subject, direct object, indirect object, refer to nominal elements that appear in designated structural positions in relation to verbal elements, in particular between subjects and predicates, and between verbs and objects.

remarkably common across language families of the world. However, in the Austronesian language family, such a clear division of labor between the canonical functions of C and T is not immediately apparent.

Many Austronesian languages exhibit a “voice” system where one particular argument is.COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.Arka, I.

Wayan and Christopher D. Manning (to appear) Voice and grammatical relations in Indonesian: a new perspective. To appear in Peter K. Austin & Simon Musgrave (eds) Voice and Grammatical Functions in Austronesian.

Google Scholar.